Treatment Expertise

Stroke & Neurological

Recovering From A Stroke

More than 700,000 people suffer a stroke each year.* Thousands more suffer from neurological conditions that can cause similar, debilitating effects. Our physical, occupational and speech therapists work with nurses and your physician to develop an individualized plan to maximize recovery. Counseling addresses lifestyle changes and what to expect during recovery.

*American Stroke Association, A Division of American Heart Association

Diathermy

Diathermy

Shortwave Diathermy uses electromagnetic waves to increase circulation in the body's tissues. Diathermy is generally used for larger treatment areas such as knees, hips and back. It helps with soft tissue injuries, slow healing wounds, arthritis, scar tissue and contractures.

close-icon
E Stim

Electrical Stimulation (E Stim)

E-Stim provides gentle electrical stimulation through electrode pads placed at or near the treatment site, which helps with neuromuscular re-education, pain and strengthening. E-Stim also assists with pain management, wounds, weakness, fall prevention, and joint and orthopedic procedures.

close-icon
Lifefitness

Lifefitness

The Lifefitness system uses an advanced pulley system to isolate muscle groups for strengthening the upper body and range of motion. The machine can accommodate patients of all sizes and abilities.

close-icon
Mat Exercise

Mat Exercise / Transfers

The mat surface is used to practice safe transfers, functional bed mobility, stretching, range of motion and other manual techniques.

close-icon
NuStep

NuStep

The NuStep helps with upper and lower body strength, range of motion and endurance for a wide variety of patients. The patient is in a seated position and uses a smooth stepping motion. It provide both upper and lower body motion work for all the major musicle groups. It helps the patient burn calories, buildng strength and improve their overall cardiovascular fitness.

close-icon
Omnicycle

Omnicycle

This unique cycling systems offers motor-assisted exercise options for upper and lower extremities. The omnicycle automatically "senses" to what degree the patient is able to exercise independently and provides powered assistance as needed to accommodate the individual's physical limitations.

close-icon
OmniVR
OmniVR

OmniVR

OmniVR uses movements in 3-dimension space to create an interactive experience, similar to popular video games. Patients using OmniVR might be working on muscle weakness, poor balance, difficulty walking or sitting upright, loss of flexibility or movement, endurance or cognitive deficits.

close-icon
Parallel bars

Parallel bars

The parallel bars offer arm support to assist with walking for short distances. Generally used for pre-gait (walking) and early gait activities, it prepares patients for safe and effective walking by addressing sit to stand skills, balance, weight shifting and development of correct gait patterns.

close-icon
Stairs

Stairs

Stair training simulates the steps at home and in the community, allowing for practice before discharge. The Dynamic Stair Trainer has adjustable stair heights so that patients recovering from orthopedic injuries or stroke can gradually use steps.

close-icon
Speech
Speech

Speech

Language Pathology Therapy services are delivered to address the needs of patients in the areas of speech production, language comprehension, language expression, cognition and swallowing.

close-icon
Synchrony

Synchrony

The Synchrony Dysphagia Solutions Program uses biofeedback to help patients to "see" the swallow and aids the speech therapist in treatment of swallowing disorders.

close-icon
Treadmill

Treadmill

Using the treadmill provides varying levels of cadence, endurance and leg strength.

close-icon
TUG

TUG

Timed Up and Go is used to assess a patient's mobility.

close-icon
Ultrasound

Ultrasound

Sound waves create a thermal and sub thermal effect which assists in tissue healing, tendonitis, muscle spasms, joint stiffness, arthritis, contractures and slow healing wounds.

close-icon
Wii

Wii

The Wii helps to increase range of motion, hand-eye coordination and motor learning and control. Patients may use it both sitting and standing to help improve strength and aerobic capacity.

close-icon

Types Of Stroke And Neurological Therapy

Your recovery begins with a skilled and knowledgeable team trained on state-of-the-art technology and equipment. Click on the icons to learn more about a specific therapy type that may be part of your stroke or neurological therapy plan.

Case Study

Shirley’s Recover Story

Patient Profile

After suffering a stroke, Shirley was recovering in the hospital, when she was told she was well enough for discharge. Shirley was still having difficulty swallowing and walking and was suffering from muscle weakness.

Post-Acute Need

The Heartland team met with Shirley and her family to create a care plan based on proven occupational, physical and speech therapy techniques. Shirely lives on her own and wanted to get back to her independence as soon as possible

Post-Acute Stay

Shirley was able to reach her highest level of practical independence post-stroke, due to the state-of-the-art, customized care. Her decision to utilize the center, likely reduced her chances for a return to the hospital, as she received the extra support needed to help her regain her strength and return to her pre-stroke lifestyle.

quote-marks

Shirley

I am very glad that my family chose Heartland for my recovery. The therapists are very patient and explained everything to me. They answered my family’s questions and encouraged me each day to do a little bit more.

Stroke Series With Dr. Mark Gloth

Dr. Mark Gloth, Chief Medical Officer of HCR ManorCare, discusses risk factors for stroke as well as some lifestyle modifications you can take to keep your brain healthy.

bookmarks

Aspirin & Stroke—A Prevention Combination

Anti-inflammatories are taken daily for the treatment and prevention of stroke, headaches, muscle pain, arthritis, fevers, and other minor aches and pains.

Read More
bookmarks

Aspirin & Stroke—A Prevention Combination

From Willow Bark to Aspirin

Anti-inflammatories are taken daily for the treatment and prevention of stroke, headaches, muscle pain, arthritis, fevers, and other minor aches and pains. We take them with a glass of water and expect them to do their job by relieving our discomfort. But, we take for granted the ingredients used in the anti-inflammatories and the qualities they possess to alleviate our symptoms. Willow bark, from the white willow or weeping willow tree, is a natural anti-inflammatory used in aspirin. Willow bark contains an active ingredient called Salicin, which researchers believe can be used to reduce pain and inflammation. In fact, the use of willow bark as a pain relieving substance can be traced back to the time of Hypocrites, when people would bite down and chew on willow bark for the purpose of relieving their pain. Years of research and trials have proven that the people of Hypocrites time were correct in discovering the benefits of willow bark in treating certain ailments. Chemists have since modified Salicin and created aspirin, or acetylsalicylic acid. Aspirin works by reducing the levels of prostaglandins, chemicals that are released when there is inflammation, by blocking the enzyme that makes prostaglandins (cyclooxygenase) reducing inflammation, pain and fever. Inhibition of prostaglandins has also been found to reduce the function of platelets and the ability of blood to clot, thus thinning the blood.

Aspirin and Stroke Prevention

Because of the blood-thinning characteristics of aspirin, a doctor may prescribe daily aspirin therapy for patients who are at risk of suffering a stroke. Daily aspirin therapy should only be started under the guidance of a physician after carefully weighing the risks and benefits to each individual. A daily aspirin can aggravate certain conditions such as bleeding stomach ulcers, blood-clotting disorders and allergies to the components of aspirin.

Side effects to daily aspirin therapy include:

  • Upset stomach
  • Heart burn
  • Gastrointestinal bleeding
  • Vertigo, or dizziness
  • Rash
  • Liver toxicity
  • Tinnitus (ringing in the ears)

When stopping an aspirin regimen, be sure to consult your physician. Suddenly stopping aspirin therapy can trigger a blood clot that could potentially cause a stroke or heart attack. You also need to let your physician know of any other prescriptions or over-the-counter medications that you take, as aspirin can interfere with certain medications, causing side effects or changing their effectiveness. Such medications include certain antibiotics and blood thinners such as Warfarin (Coumadin).

 

Sources:

Willow bark | University of Maryland Medical Center—http://umm.edu/health/medical/altmed/herb/willow-bark#ixzz3IFjNCIYY

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/heart-disease/in-depth/daily-aspirin-therapy/art-20046797

Web MD—http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-955-willow%20bark.aspx?activeingredientid=955&activeingredientname=willow%20bark

http://www.medicinenet.com/acetylsalicylic_acid/article.htmWHen

close-icon
bookmarks

Helping Loved Ones After a Stroke

Caring for a loved one after a stroke can be just a scary as the stroke itself. Learn four simple ways you can help make the most of their stroke recovery.

Read More
bookmarks

Helping Loved Ones After a Stroke

After a Stroke: 4 Ways to Advocate for Loved Ones

When a loved one suffers from a stroke, the days after can be just as scary and stressful as the stroke itself. Suddenly, you’re navigating unfamiliar medical terms, treatment plans and working to understand the stroke’s impact. It’s no surprise that caregivers can feel overwhelmed and even powerless.

Fortunately, there are four simple steps you can take to feel empowered and start advocating for your loved one as they begin their recovery.

 

1. Educate yourself.

Understand the basics of stroke. It’s the first step to navigating a loved one’s recovery and care. Spend some time reviewing trusted resources, including brochures provided by the hospital or websites like the American Stroke Association, The National Stroke Association and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

If you haven’t already, try to get a general understanding about:

  • The type of stroke your loved one had
  • The area of the brain affected
  • Expected effects of the stroke
  • Recommended treatments including therapy, medicines and rehabilitation

 

2. Speak up.

You are your loved one’s most important advocate during stroke recovery. Speak up and ask questions to make sure your loved one gets the best possible rehabilitation and care.

Talk regularly with doctors, nurses and therapists about their treatment plan. If you don’t understand something, ask them to explain it again. If you’ve read something you found interesting, share it with the medical team and find out if it could apply to your loved one’s situation.

 

3. Get ready for discharge.

Leaving the hospital is one of the most stressful times for caregivers. You may find yourself asking:

  • Will my loved one be able to return home?
  • Is our home equipped to deal with any complications from the stroke?
  • Am I able to provide the care my loved one needs?
  • What type of services will my loved one receive in a skilled nursing and rehabilitation center
  • How do I find the right care facility for my loved one? Check out this chart on how to review and choose a rehab center 

 

Those questions are just the tip of the iceberg and, unfortunately, are not easily answered. Spend time with your loved one’s medical team to fully understand your options.

If your loved one is able to return home, make sure it’s a safe place and can meet their needs. Work with doctors and therapists to understand what is needed, and enlist help getting your home ready. And, if you find yourself seeking short-term rehabilitation or long-term skilled nursing care, take heart knowing there are many reliable options available today, including Heartland Health Care Centers and ManorCare Health Services. We offer a wide-range of services including short-term rehabilitation services to meet the needs of the community and long-term residential care.

Our post-hospital care services help ease the transition from hospital to home, providing the necessary skilled nursing, rehabilitation and support your loved one needs. Long-term options include nursing home care, assisted living and independent living. These types of care can evolve to match the level of support needed to ensure your loved one can live with dignity and as much independence as possible.

 

4. Build your own support network.

It’s important to take care of yourself when you’re caring for a loved one. Spend time building your own support network before you need it. Know which friend you can call for a long talk, where you can go to relax and unwind, and who can pitch in to lend a hand when you need a break.

For more information on stroke recovery care and to learn more about care options, contact the center nearest you http://www.heartland-manorcare.com/locations.

close-icon

Looking For More Information?

Visit Our Health & Wellness Resources Page

Learn More

Ready To Speak With Someone?

Our team will be happy to help you.

Contact Us