Treatment Expertise

Pulmonary Care

A Team Approach To Healthy Breathing

Pulmonary care is administered by interdisciplinary teams that often include a physician to coordinate care; a respiratory therapist to provide consultation; physical and occupational therapists focused on exercise, ambulation, breathing retraining and independent living skills; social services and discharge planning; and dietary services.

ADL Kitchen

ADL Kitchen

The Activities of Daily Living (ADL) kitchen area allows patients to practice instrumental tasks related to meal preparation and cooking.

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ADL Laundry

ADL Laundry

The simulated laundry area allows patients to practice the tasks associated with laundry to enhance independence when at home.

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Lifefitness

Lifefitness

The Lifefitness system uses an advanced pulley system to isolate muscle groups for strengthening the upper body and range of motion. The machine can accommodate patients of all sizes and abilities.

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Mat Exercise

Mat Exercise / Transfers

The mat surface is used to practice safe transfers, functional bed mobility, stretching, range of motion and other manual techniques.

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NuStep

NuStep

The NuStep helps with upper and lower body strength, range of motion and endurance for a wide variety of patients. The patient is in a seated position and uses a smooth stepping motion. It provide both upper and lower body motion work for all the major musicle groups. It helps the patient burn calories, buildng strength and improve their overall cardiovascular fitness.

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Omnicycle

Omnicycle

This unique cycling systems offers motor-assisted exercise options for upper and lower extremities. The omnicycle automatically "senses" to what degree the patient is able to exercise independently and provides powered assistance as needed to accommodate the individual's physical limitations.

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OmniVR
OmniVR

OmniVR

OmniVR uses movements in 3-dimension space to create an interactive experience, similar to popular video games. Patients using OmniVR might be working on muscle weakness, poor balance, difficulty walking or sitting upright, loss of flexibility or movement, endurance or cognitive deficits.

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Outdoor Path

Outdoor Path

Our therapy team uses a realistic environment to allow patients to work on obstacles they may face in the community, including the various surfaces and inclines they may encounter.

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Parallel bars

Parallel bars

The parallel bars offer arm support to assist with walking for short distances. Generally used for pre-gait (walking) and early gait activities, it prepares patients for safe and effective walking by addressing sit to stand skills, balance, weight shifting and development of correct gait patterns.

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Stairs

Stairs

Stair training simulates the steps at home and in the community, allowing for practice before discharge. The Dynamic Stair Trainer has adjustable stair heights so that patients recovering from orthopedic injuries or stroke can gradually use steps.

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Speech
Speech

Speech

Language Pathology Therapy services are delivered to address the needs of patients in the areas of speech production, language comprehension, language expression, cognition and swallowing.

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Synchrony

Synchrony

The Synchrony Dysphagia Solutions Program uses biofeedback to help patients to "see" the swallow and aids the speech therapist in treatment of swallowing disorders.

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Treadmill

Treadmill

Using the treadmill provides varying levels of cadence, endurance and leg strength.

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TUG

TUG

Timed Up and Go is used to assess a patient's mobility.

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Types Of Pulmonary Therapy

We are committed to aggressive and intensive respiratory care designed to maximize independent function while improving your physical and psychological well-being. Click on the icons to learn more about a specific therapy type that may be part of your pulmonary therapy plan.

Case Study

Jim’s Recovery Story

Patient Profile

Jim is a 70-year-old male who was hospitalized for pneumonia. He became very weak, had trouble walking and difficulty eating after his trach was removed. Jim was told he could benefit from therapy before returning home.

Post-Acute Need

Jim needed to feel confident moving from his bed to a chair, he needed strengthening to be able to walk safely and speech therapy to help improve his lung health and ability to swallow.

Post-Acute Stay

At the center, the interdisciplinary team created a care plan to help Jim meet his goals. The nursing team managed his medication, vitals and breathing treatments. The therapy team worked on safe swallowing and breathing exercises, strengthening and balance so Jim could transfer and move safely.

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Jim

I was worried about starting a therapy regimen, but it was a crucial part of my recovery. Now I am back home and feel confident in my ability to get around safely. I'm now able to get back to my neighborhood card game.

Oxygen Delivery with Dr. Mark Gloth

Dr. Mark Gloth, Chief Medical Officer of HCR ManorCare, discusses oxygen delivery and flow as well as some lifestyle modifications you can make to keep your lungs healthy.

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Pneumonia and Prevention

Learn about pneumonia and if you could be at risk for this lung disease.

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Pneumonia and Prevention

Pneumonia develops when you breathe germs into your lungs. The disease is often preceded by the flu or a cold, which makes it harder for your lungs to fight off infection. Long-term or chronic illnesses such as asthma, cancer, diabetes and heart disease can also increase your risk for pneumonia.

When a person contracts pneumonia, the air sacks (alveoli) may fill with pus or fluid in one or both lungs. This build-up most often causes coughing (with or without mucus), chills, chest pain when breathing or coughing, fast breathing and/or heart rate, fever and fatigue.

Older adults may experience different symptoms with pneumonia. There may or may not be a fever and cough. Or the cough may be present, but not producing any mucus. But the main sign of pneumonia in older generations is confusion, delirium or a change in how they think. Additionally, if a lung disease already exists, that disease may get worse.

Risk factors for contracting pneumonia*:

  • Cigarette smoking
  • Recent viral respiratory infection (a cold, laryngitis or influenza)
  • Difficulty swallowing due to stroke, dementia, Parkinson's disease or other neurological conditions
  • Chronic lung disease (COPD, bronchiectasis or cystic fibrosis)
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Other serious illnesses such as heart disease, liver, cirrhosis or diabetes
  • Impaired consciousness or brain function due to dementia, stroke or other neurologic conditions
  • Recent surgery or trauma
  • Having a weakened immune system due to illness, certain medications and autoimmune disorders

 

Can pneumonia be prevented? Yes it can! Follow the steps below to reduce your risk:

  • Don’t smoke, as tobacco lowers your lungs' ability to fight off infection.
  • Get a flu vaccine every year since influenza is a common cause of pneumonia.
    • Additional vaccines that prevent bacteria or virus infections that may lead to pneumonia are haemophilus influenza type b (Hib), measles, pertussis (whooping cough) and varicella (chickenpox).
  • Those at high risk should consider getting a pneumococcal pneumonia vaccine.
  • Keep up healthy habits of a balanced diet, adequate rest and regular exercise.
  • Wash your hands often, especially after blowing your nose, coughing or sneezing, or going to the bathroom and before eating or preparing foods.

If you think you have contracted pneumonia, or your cold symptoms persist, make sure to contact your physician. Physicians can prescribe antibiotics and antiviral medications to treat common forms of pneumonia.

 

*According to the American Lung Association.

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Managing an Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Diagnosis

Nearly 25 million Americans suffer from COPD. There is no cure, but there are ways to effectively manage a COPD diagnosis and its symptoms.

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Managing an Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) Diagnosis

Nearly 25 million Americans have chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). If you or a loved one has recently been diagnosed, you may struggle with more than catching your breath.

A COPD diagnosis can be overwhelming. You likely have a lot of questions about how to manage the disease, what to expect and how to recognize signs that it’s progressing. While there is no cure for COPD or treatment that reverses its progression, there are ways to manage its symptoms. Here are two steps to help you or your loved one cope with COPD.

 

Step 1: Manage COPD symptoms

Work closely with your care team on a treatment plan to help minimize COPD symptoms. You or your loved one may be asked to:

  • Quit smoking. Quit smoking immediately and remember that your care team can help. There are many tools and resources to make quitting easier.
  • Avoid lung irritants. Avoid being around other smokers and stay away from places with chemical fumes or heavy dust. Check air quality often and stay inside on days quality is low.
  • Eat healthy. COPD and its symptoms, including shortness of breath and fatigue, can make eating difficult. Try eating smaller, more frequent meals.
  • Follow exercise recommendations. Staying active can be difficult with COPD, but it’s a big part of staying healthy and strong. Ask your doctor about activity and exercise limits and be sure to follow recommendations.
  • Take medicines as directed. It’s extremely important to take medicines as directed to help manage symptoms and reduce the chance of an exacerbation. These medicines can include a bronchodilator, which helps relax the airway, or a combination of a bronchodilator and steroids. A rescue inhaler may also be needed in case of an emergency. If given a rescue inhaler, you or your loved one should keep it with you at all times.
  • Get a flu shot. For COPD sufferers, symptoms and complications from common illnesses like influenza (the flu) and pneumonia, can be much more severe and increase the risk of hospitalization. You or your loved one should get an annual flu shot and stay up-to-date with the pneumococcal vaccine.

 

Step 2: Make a plan

COPD is a chronic disease. It will not go away and will only worsen over time. It’s important to plan for the future and know what to do in case of an emergency.

Know when to seek immediate care.
Complications, such as an illness or infection, can cause COPD to quickly worsen. It’s important to understand when it’s appropriate to call your doctor and when the need is more urgent. Know where to go for care and keep emergency medicines and numbers nearby - you may need to act quickly.

Plan for the future.
As COPD progresses, symptoms will worsen. Work with your care team and loved ones to have a plan in place before that happens. Ask each other:

  • Will it be possible to stay at home?
  • What care will be needed and where is the best place to receive it?
  • What is most important during treatment of advanced COPD?
  • Do you have a living will in place so others understand your choices?
  • Do you know at what stage you wish treatment to be discontinued?

 

Managing COPD and its symptoms every day can be difficult and so is caring for someone with the disease. Have open conversation to prepare for the future. It can help reduce stress and anxiety over what tomorrow may hold.

You can learn more about the short- and long-term, skilled nursing and rehabilitation care available at Heartland-ManorCare, including our experienced pulmonary team. We offer many care options for COPD sufferers as well as support for caregivers.

For more information on our pulmonary care and rehabilitation services, and to learn more about care options, find the center nearest you at heartland-manorcare.com.

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