Treatment Expertise

Cardiac Care

Cardiac Patients Benefit From Specialized Care

If you have suffered a heart attack, heart failure, coronary artery disease (CAD), hypertension, unstable angina, or an intervention, we will work with you and your physician to help you return home with the knowledge and skill to maintain your highest level of independence. Our team helps you modify risk factors and lifestyle behaviors such as diet, exercise and more.

ADL Kitchen

ADL Kitchen

The Activities of Daily Living (ADL) kitchen area allows patients to practice instrumental tasks related to meal preparation and cooking.

close-icon
ADL Laundry

ADL Laundry

The simulated laundry area allows patients to practice the tasks associated with laundry to enhance independence when at home.

close-icon
Lifefitness

Lifefitness

The Lifefitness system uses an advanced pulley system to isolate muscle groups for strengthening the upper body and range of motion. The machine can accommodate patients of all sizes and abilities.

close-icon
Mat Exercise

Mat Exercise / Transfers

The mat surface is used to practice safe transfers, functional bed mobility, stretching, range of motion and other manual techniques.

close-icon
NuStep

NuStep

The NuStep helps with upper and lower body strength, range of motion and endurance for a wide variety of patients. The patient is in a seated position and uses a smooth stepping motion. It provide both upper and lower body motion work for all the major musicle groups. It helps the patient burn calories, buildng strength and improve their overall cardiovascular fitness.

close-icon
Omnicycle

Omnicycle

This unique cycling systems offers motor-assisted exercise options for upper and lower extremities. The omnicycle automatically "senses" to what degree the patient is able to exercise independently and provides powered assistance as needed to accommodate the individual's physical limitations.

close-icon
OmniVR
OmniVR

OmniVR

OmniVR uses movements in 3-dimension space to create an interactive experience, similar to popular video games. Patients using OmniVR might be working on muscle weakness, poor balance, difficulty walking or sitting upright, loss of flexibility or movement, endurance or cognitive deficits.

close-icon
Outdoor Path

Outdoor Path

Our therapy team uses a realistic environment to allow patients to work on obstacles they may face in the community, including the various surfaces and inclines they may encounter.

close-icon
Parallel bars

Parallel bars

The parallel bars offer arm support to assist with walking for short distances. Generally used for pre-gait (walking) and early gait activities, it prepares patients for safe and effective walking by addressing sit to stand skills, balance, weight shifting and development of correct gait patterns.

close-icon
Stairs

Stairs

Stair training simulates the steps at home and in the community, allowing for practice before discharge. The Dynamic Stair Trainer has adjustable stair heights so that patients recovering from orthopedic injuries or stroke can gradually use steps.

close-icon
Treadmill

Treadmill

Using the treadmill provides varying levels of cadence, endurance and leg strength.

close-icon
TUG

TUG

Timed Up and Go is used to assess a patient's mobility.

close-icon

Types Of Cardiac Therapy

There are a number of ways people with cardiac disease benefit from a specialized level of care. Click on the icons to learn more about a specific therapy type that may be part of your cardiac recovery care plan.

Case Study

Russell’s Recovery Story

Patient Profile

Russell is a 68 year old male with a history of heart disease. After experiencing a heart attack, Russell underwent heart surgery. His doctor recommended post-acute skilled nursing and rehabilitation services before returning home.

Post-Acute Need

Russell lives on his own in a split level house and was independent before his heart attack. He needed strengthening to climb his steps safely and make lifestyle adjustments. He also needed to improve his ability to care for his daily needs such as preparing meals, dressing and bathing.

Post-Acute Stay

At the center, the interdisciplinary team created a care plan to help Russell meet his goals. The nursing team took care of Russell's wound, taught him about wound care and medication management. The therapy team worked with Russell to regain strength so he could use the steps at home. He also learned techniques to manage his energy level while dressing, bathing and preparing meals. The dietary and clinical team helped Russell work on lifestyle changes such as diet and managing stress.

quote-marks

Russell

After my heart attack I wanted to get back to my life and my own home, but I was very fearful about returning home on my own so I opted to transition in a skilled nursing center. After my rehab stay, I am back home and comfortable being on my own and taking care of myself. I can safely walk up and down my steps and I know what I need to do to help prevent another heart attack.

Matters of the Heart with Dr. Mark Gloth

Dr. Mark Gloth, Chief Medical Officer of HCR ManorCare, discusses the causes of heart disease as well as some lifestyle modifications you can take to keep your heart healthy.

bookmarks

Coping with a Congestive Heart Failure Diagnosis

Five million people are diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF) each year. Learn how understanding the diagnosis and having a plan can give back control.

Read More
bookmarks

Coping with a Congestive Heart Failure Diagnosis

Congestive heart failure (CHF) can be a scary diagnosis for everyone involved. Patients may become concerned about their future; loved ones and caregivers can become overwhelmed by treatment plans and on-going care, not to mention the emotional strain of the diagnosis itself.

If your loved one has been diagnosed with CHF, take a deep breath and educate yourself. Taking the time to understand the diagnosis is essential to managing the condition, and treating it as it progresses.

 

Understand the Diagnosis

More than 5 million people are diagnosed with heart failure every year, according to the American Heart Association. Congestive heart failure is a type of heart failure where inadequate blood flow causes fluid build-up in the lungs or body (often around the arms, hands or legs). Heart failure is a chronic condition, which means the disease will continue to progress. The American Heart Association has created four stages to describe each level of the disease:

  • Stage A is often used for individuals who are at high risk of developing heart failure, but have not yet been diagnosed. They may have pre-existing conditions such as diabetes, high blood pressure, family history, coronary artery disease and others.
  • Stage B is when individuals have systolic left ventricle dysfunction, but have not been diagnosed with heart failure. This could include people who have valve disease, cardiomyopathy or suffered a heart attack.
  • Stage C is used when people have known heart disease and are exhibiting symptoms of congestive heart failure, including fluid build-up, shortness of breath, fatigue and inability to exercise.
  • Stage D refers to advanced heart failure and continued progression of the disease, despite continued, on-going care.

While you can’t reverse the progression of heart failure, there are many things you can do to manage the condition and slow its progression.

 

Manage Congestive Heart Failure

Your doctor will go over the treatment and management plan that’s right for your loved one. Depending on the type of congestive heart failure, and its stage, treatment could include eating healthy, taking prescribed medicines, exercise when possible or even surgery.

Just as important as following the doctor’s guidelines for managing the disease is planning for its progression. As hard as it may be to sit down and consider the future, doing so is a crucial step in making sure you’re prepared for what may come. Consider:

  • A plan for continued care
  • Care options if staying at home is no longer the best option
  • A living will to help make health care decisions when your loved one is unable to do so for him or herself
  • An agreement about when care should be discontinued

If you need short term rehabilitation and skilled nursing care following a hospital stay,  Heartland-ManorCare’s skilled and experienced staff is here to provide the care and support you need before returning home. We work closely with you to develop a care plan that’s right for you or your loved one.

Our long-term residential options include nursing home care, assisted living and independent living that can evolve to provide the level of care needed to ensure your loved one is living with as much independence as possible.

Formore information on our cardiac care and therapy programs or to find the facility nearest you, please go to http://www.heartland-manorcare.com.

close-icon
bookmarks

Nutrition and Cardiac Health

Good eating habits and lifestyle changes can help lower the risk of developing high cholesterol and heart disease.

Read More
bookmarks

Nutrition and Cardiac Health

Being overweight, not exercising and having high cholesterol levels have been associated with an increased risk of developing heart disease. Good eating habits and lifestyle changes can help lower the risk. Eating foods high in dietary cholesterol, trans fatty acids and saturated fat raises cholesterol in the blood. A diet rich in whole grains, fruit, vegetables, and omega 3 fatty acids may help with weight loss, lower cholesterol and decrease your risk of heart disease.

Suggestions:

  • Eat at least 3 servings of vegetables every day
  • Avoid foods containing high amounts of saturated fats (examples: meat, butter, lard and full fat dairy products)
  • Read food labels and do not eat foods containing trans fatty acids (examples: stick margarine, shortening, high fat pre-packaged baked goods)
  • Buy whole wheat bread products, brown rice and whole grain cereals to add fiber and antioxidants to your diet
  • Eat fatty fish such as salmon, tuna, mackerel and sardines for heart healthy omega 3 fatty acids
  • Eliminate processed and convenience foods
  • Limit sodium intake by not adding salt during cooking or at the table

What is Sodium?

Sodium is a mineral found naturally in many foods. The most significant source of sodium in the diet is table salt, which is about 40% sodium. Processed, convenience, and preserved foods also contain a large amount of sodium. The body needs very little sodium to function well. 

Why Limit Sodium?

A build-up of sodium in the body can cause thirst, increased blood pressure, shortness of breath, and water retention. Decreasing sodium in the diet can reduce fluid retention and the risk of heart attack or stroke associated with high blood pressure. Keep in mind that there are many other factors involved in these health problems. Heredity, obesity, lack of exercise, cigarette smoking, stress, and what you eat all play a role.

Eating Out

Generally, foods served in restaurants are often seasoned with salt and/or MSG. Request to have an item prepared without these seasonings. Good choices are broiled or roasted meats, fish, or poultry without sauces or gravies. Baked potato and salad should be ordered with allowed dressings on the side. Fruits and sherbet or ice cream are lower in sodium than rich pastries and desserts (such as pie). 
“Fast foods” are generally high in sodium. Careful selection is required. For example, choose a hamburger, roast beef, or sliced chicken sandwich without added condiments (like “secret sauces”). Lettuce, tomato, and mayonnaise are okay.

HCR ManorCare skilled nursing centers have teamed up with Sodexo to provide patients with healthy , nutritious meals made from scratch in the center’s kitchen.

HCR ManorCare skilled nursing centers have teamed up with Sodexo to provide patients with healthy , nutritious meals made from scratch in the center’s kitchen.

HCR ManorCare clinical dietitians consult with the patient and family as well as the care team to develop customized nutrition plans to help ensure patients receive the best possible nutritional care to meet their individual goals. Our wellness program’s nutrition criteria meet the dietary guidelines of most health organizations.

Additional Information:

Refer to the following websites for additional information on nutrition and cardiac health:

American Heart Association
www.heart.org

Dietary Guidelines for Americans
health.gov/dietaryguidelines/

USDA MyPlate
Choosemyplate.gov

Consult with your physician or registered dietitian if you have questions.

Adapted from Sodexo Senior Living, Resident and Nutrition Services, Heart Healthy Living; Sodexo, Feed your body of knowledge, When your nutrition prescription is two gram sodium, 9/2012; Sodexo, Feed your body of knowledge, Nutrition guidelines for heart health, 9/2012

close-icon

Looking For More Information?

Visit Our Health & Wellness Resources Page

Learn More

Ready To Speak With Someone?

Our team will be happy to help you.

Contact Us